Penn Nursing

Posts Tagged ‘Philadelphia’

Healthy Babies

In Women's Health on April 5, 2010 at 2:19 pm

No matter where you are in the world – in Philadelphia’s inner city or the teeming slums of Cairo, the urgency to have healthy births and babies is paramount.

Sessions at the 18th Annual International Congress on Women’s Health Issues focuses on programs to keep women healthy and make sure their children are, too.

One session at the conference is looking at how working mothers in Bangkok are able to continue breast feeding their babies, dealing with balancing the pressure from work and breastfeeding.

Another looks at health care programs in Texas for mostly foreign-born Hispanic women who did not receive early prenatal care. The result: a high infant mortality rate.

That program in Houston looks at the importance of using a community to empower women, given them information about their health and increase access to health care.

The mothers formed community coalitions with churches, local businesses, elected officials and the media to get the word out about healthy pregnancies for healthy individuals.

The conference also looks at a program in Kenya where medical and community officials are working toward humanizing the childbirth practice, establishing something as simple as waiting rooms to better accommodate clients and allowing women to be accompanied and choose a position during childbirth.

Any country and every community has an obligation to provide the best care possible for their pregnant women and to make sure their health and the health of their babies is not affected by a bad delivery system. The conference is taking a look at childbearing in many ways to find new programs and commitments for healthy children.

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How are pregnant women getting healthcare in Philadelphia?

In Women's Health on March 15, 2010 at 5:04 pm

Preterm labor has increased more in Philadelphia in the state overall. The question is why? How are pregnant women getting healthcare in Philadelphia? Are there long distances to travel and longer waits?

In West Philadelphia, infant mortality was 16 percent, compared to 11.5 percent in Philadelphia overall and 6.7 percent nationally. The question is why and what can health providers do about this?

Women in Burlington County, N.J., across the river from Philadelphia, live five years longer than their Philadelphia neighbors. In Montgomery County, they live six years longer. The question is why?

The 18th annual Congress on women’s health issues will take a critical look at what’s happening to women’s health in urban America, the good news and the bad. And it will engage in a dialogue about issues women face in cities that impact their health and life experiences.

–         Judi Hasson

Can a latrine really make a difference in improving women’s health?

In Women's Health on March 15, 2010 at 5:02 pm

Penn- ICOWHI conference

The 18th annual international women’s health conference April 7-10

University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

Can a latrine really make a difference in improving women’s health?

In many parts of the world, it certainly can. It’s one of many issues that are the focus of this year’s conference on women’s health issues in urban settings around the world from the streets of Mumbai to health disparities in American cities like Philadelphia.

The lynchpin of all this is the impact of urban environments on women’s health. The 18th Congress on women’s health issues “Cities and Women’s Health: Global Perspectives” will look at all these issues and new strategies to enhance women’s health in cities.

It will look at health disparities around the world that impact women’s health. And it will investigate strategies to make their lives better and healthier.

The scope of the Penn-ICOWHI 18th International Congress is both global and interdisciplinary. Sessions look at diseases and conditions of women and girls in urban environments, the risk and resiliency of urban women and girls, the importance of educating girls and keeping them in school to empower them and how to foster health in urban environments.

–         Judi Hasson