Penn Nursing

Rx for Women’s Health

In Women's Health on April 6, 2010 at 11:52 am

For the first time in history, more than half of the world’s population lives in urban environments, and the Penn-ICOWHI 18th Conference this week in Philadelphia will explore redesigning cities for active living, increasing access to health care, treating adolescent girls in high-risk environments, eliminating policy gaps that undermine women’s health, and curbing domestic violence. 

The conference is bringing international experts in city planning, health policy, public policy, education, sociology, and others together to address how health issues facing women  are exacerbated by city living. Speakers include: 

  • A refugee from Kenya who will discuss the health of women affected by post-election violence
  • A Women’s Health Volunteer from Iran; currently, 100,000 such volunteers provide care for nearly 20 million people in the country 
  • Mamphela Ramphele, MD, a leading anti-apartheid activist and current executive chair of Circle Capital Ventures, a Cape Town-based black economic empowerment company    
  • Sheela Patel, founder and director of a Mumbai-based NGO designed to address the needs of “slumdog’s mother” – women living on pavements and in slums in different parts of India

 The conditions in cities impact the health of women all over the globe, from maternal mortality rates in the slums of New Delhi – where a study to be presented at the conference found poor pregnant women were routinely refused admission and denied registration in local hospitals and forced to deliver their babies without proper medical care – to infant mortality rates in America – where another session will present data that show infant mortality rates are higher in poorer neighborhoods than national averages.

 The four-day conference is looking for solutions. Can cities be made livable? Can decent health care be delivered under the most difficult of circumstances?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: